snow on rocks, or dirt, or grass, or sharks

CB Avalanche Center 2017-18 Observations

Location: Paradise Divide Area
Date of Observation: 12/29/2017
Name: Evan Ross

Subject: snow on rocks, or dirt, or grass, or sharks
Aspect: East, South East, South
Elevation: 9,500-12,560

Avalanches:

Checked out the Augusta avalanche reported after the Christmas Storm. In a pit below the crown about 100ft and off the left side of its flank the HS was about 60cm’s. Basically, the Christmas Storm was sitting on the 12/23 wind event and denser snow, down to the ground. Any previous snow was poorly distributed through the rocky terrain. ECTN at this interface on small decomposing grains. The Augusta natural avalanche appeared to fail on this interface and not at the ground. The avalanche size was an R1 in the terrain, while debris where difficult to map as the snow surface has blown back over and been blended back in.

Weather: Few clouds in the morning becoming clear by afternoon. Moderate westerly winds at 12,560.
Snowpack: On south and southeasterly facing slopes there wasn’t much difference in snowpack structure from 9,500ft up to 12,560ft, other then snowpack depth. ECTX at 11,200ft on SE facing 33 degree slope. ECTN at 12500ft on SE facing 36 degree slope. Small column tests could produce resistant shears below the Christmas Storm on non-persistent decomposing small grains. On these aspects throughout the elevation traveled the snowpack begin with the 12/21 storm.

Turned around on one ENE facing slope that was a small roller in the terrain. As the snowpack doubled in hight with very weak snow below stronger snow….

Photos:

Slab avalanche that failed during the Christmas Storm on a steep easterly facing slope just below 12,000ft. A more recent loose dry avalanche can be seen lookers left.

Turned around on this easterly facing slope that was a small roller in the terrain. As the snowpack doubled in hight with very weak snow below stronger snow….

Snowpack at about 11,500ft on a southeasterly facing slope. Any snow previous to 12/21 was very thin and poorly dispersed through the terrain.0

Snowpack at 11,000ft on a southeasterly facing 30 degree slope.

Snowpack at 12,500ft SE aspect. Basically, the Christmas Storm was sitting on the 12/23 wind event and denser snow, down to the ground. Any previous snow was poorly distributed through the rocky terrain. ECTX on the 12/23 interface on small decomposing grains.

Natural slab avalanche that likely failed near the end of the Christmas Storm. NNW aspect at 11,400ft.

Wet avalanche debris below a southeasterly facing terrain i the upper Middle Anthracite Creek.

Snowpack coverage on the north face of Augusta Mountain. Cross loaded or blown out was the theme.

Looking up at the Augusta avalanche that failed during the Christmas Storm.