• Backcountry Avalanche Forecast
  • Forecast Discussion

Sun, Apr 21, 2019 at 6:52 AM
Issued by: CBAC

Today

 

Tomorrow

Moderate (2) Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully.   No Rating (-) Insufficent information for to establish the avalanche danger.
Moderate (2) Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully.   No Rating (-) Insufficent information for to establish the avalanche danger.
Moderate (2) Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully.   No Rating (-) Insufficent information for to establish the avalanche danger.
  Danger Scale

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Summary

You thought the Easter Bunny was cool, but then homie stuck a bunch of clouds on your spring ski day. What's your opinion of the Easter Bunny now? Hopefully, he didn’t give you one of those hollow chocolate bunnies too. 

The bunny did bring an ok freeze last night at least. Clouds may help keep last nights surface crusts from breaking down and exposing the wet snow below. If that is the case, then you’ll find little in the way of a wet avalanche problem today. Though if those crusts do break down, then be ready for the possibility of initiating Loose Wet Avalanches. These would be generally small in size, but can grow large in bigger terrain or if they gouge into a wet snowpack. 

At upper elevations, it's worth keeping an eye on any overhead Cornice hazard. There has been a number or large cornice releases in the last week. Today's clouds will also help decrease the threat of them falling down, but given recent warm temperatures and their difficult to predict natural of releasing, this avalanche problem continues to deserve some respect. 

 

Avalanche Problem

 
problem icon
N
S
E
W
NW
NE
SE
SW
Above Treeline
Near Treeline
Below Treeline
Certain
Very Likely
Likely
Possible
Unlikely
Historic
Very Large
Large
Small
Problem Type Aspect/Elevation Likelihood Size

What You Need to Know About These Avalanches


Loose wet avalanches occur where water is running through the snowpack, and release at or below the trigger point. Avoid terrain traps such as cliffs, gullies, or tree wells. Exit avalanche terrain when you see pinwheels, roller balls, a slushy surface, or during rain-on-snow events.

Avalanche Problem

 
problem icon
N
S
E
W
NW
NE
SE
SW
Above Treeline
Near Treeline
Below Treeline
Certain
Very Likely
Likely
Possible
Unlikely
Historic
Very Large
Large
Small
Problem Type Aspect/Elevation Likelihood Size

What You Need to Know About These Avalanches


Cornices are easy to identify and are confined to lee and cross-loaded ridges, sub-ridges, and sharp convexities. They are easiest to trigger during periods of rapid growth (new snow and wind), rapid warming, and during rain-on-snow events. Cornices often catch people by surprise when they break farther back onto flatter areas than expected.

Avalanche Problem

 
problem icon
N
S
E
W
NW
NE
SE
SW
Above Treeline
Near Treeline
Below Treeline
Certain
Very Likely
Likely
Possible
Unlikely
Historic
Very Large
Large
Small
Problem Type Aspect/Elevation Likelihood Size

What You Need to Know About These Avalanches


Cornices are easy to identify and are confined to lee and cross-loaded ridges, sub-ridges, and sharp convexities. They are easiest to trigger during periods of rapid growth (new snow and wind), rapid warming, and during rain-on-snow events. Cornices often catch people by surprise when they break farther back onto flatter areas than expected.

Archived Forecasts

  • Select Forecast: Valid

Sun, Apr 21, 2019 at 7:20 AM
Issued by: CBAC  

The snowpack has come a long way in making its transition into spring. Recent storms have been small and done little to change conditions, while this next storm also isn’t looking to produce much for change either. I sure hope to eat my words and it just dumps today! Though, there isn’t much chance of that happening. Springtime travel advice will continue to reign supreme. With that, the CBAC will be ending daily forecasts and post its springtime travel advice by tomorrow. We will continue to update the observations page with any condition or avalanche information that comes in.

We have had an exiting avalanche season this past winter. All the events that made up this winter will currently be one to remember. We owe you a big thank you for all the observations that were sent in as we did our best to forecast conditions, and for the support that you have given this avalanche center. 

Cheers to the 2018/19 winter! We’ll be out there making the most of this great spring snow coverage and taking trips to the dessert. I’ll be the blinding white person with their shirt off, trying to blend in my ring around the neck tan line. 

From all of us at the CBAC, have a great spring!

Five Day Trend

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  • No Rating
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    Low
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    Moderate
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    Considerable
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    High
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    Extreme