• Backcountry Avalanche Forecast
  • Forecast Discussion

Fri, Apr 14, 2017 at 5:36 AM
Issued by: CBAC

Today

 

Tomorrow

No Rating (-) Insufficent information for to establish the avalanche danger.   No Rating (-) Insufficent information for to establish the avalanche danger.
No Rating (-) Insufficent information for to establish the avalanche danger.   No Rating (-) Insufficent information for to establish the avalanche danger.
No Rating (-) Insufficent information for to establish the avalanche danger.   No Rating (-) Insufficent information for to establish the avalanche danger.
  Danger Scale

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    Extreme

Summary

It would be just another day for Bill Murray and the Groundhog. Clear sky again last night has allowed the upper snowpack to refreeze while temperatures at 11,000ft dipped to right near freezing early this morning. Wet avalanche activity has dropped off over the last week and has remained small in size. With a string of mild overnight temperatures, backcountry travelers need to keep an eye out for the potential of loose wet activity gouging deeper into the snowpack and becoming larger. Suspect areas for these potently larger loose wet avalanches would be where the snowpack thins and becomes unsupportive, near rock outcrops for example, or where you find more then 6” of wet snow.

 

Stay ahead of wet avalanche problems by following the sun around the compass. Start early on east facing aspects and move to south then west as the sun tracks across the sky. While your moving through the terrain, slow down and observe how wet the upper snowpack has become. If your finding more then 6” of wet snow or the snowpack is becoming unsupportive to your boots, you could be dealing with a potentially larger avalanche problem.

 

This is the CBAC’s last conditions update. Tomorrow morning we’ll post our end of the season spring travel advice. Keep the communication going with the rest of the community by submitting what your seeing via observations and the CBAC will keep that page updated.

 

Avalanche Problem

 
problem icon
N
S
E
W
NW
NE
SE
SW
Above Treeline
Near Treeline
Below Treeline
Certain
Very Likely
Likely
Possible
Unlikely
Historic
Very Large
Large
Small
Problem Type Aspect/Elevation Likelihood Size

What You Need to Know About These Avalanches


Loose wet avalanches occur where water is running through the snowpack, and release at or below the trigger point. Avoid terrain traps such as cliffs, gullies, or tree wells. Exit avalanche terrain when you see pinwheels, roller balls, a slushy surface, or during rain-on-snow events.

Avalanche Problem

 
problem icon
N
S
E
W
NW
NE
SE
SW
Above Treeline
Near Treeline
Below Treeline
Certain
Very Likely
Likely
Possible
Unlikely
Historic
Very Large
Large
Small
Problem Type Aspect/Elevation Likelihood Size

What You Need to Know About These Avalanches


Wind slabs can take up to a week to stabilize. They are confined to lee and cross-loaded terrain features and can be avoided by sticking to sheltered or wind scoured areas.

Avalanche Problem

 
problem icon
N
S
E
W
NW
NE
SE
SW
Above Treeline
Near Treeline
Below Treeline
Certain
Very Likely
Likely
Possible
Unlikely
Historic
Very Large
Large
Small
Problem Type Aspect/Elevation Likelihood Size

What You Need to Know About These Avalanches


Loose wet avalanches occur where water is running through the snowpack, and release at or below the trigger point. Avoid terrain traps such as cliffs, gullies, or tree wells. Exit avalanche terrain when you see pinwheels, roller balls, a slushy surface, or during rain-on-snow events.

Archived Forecasts

  • Select Forecast: Valid

Fri, Apr 14, 2017 at 5:58 AM
Issued by: CBAC  

The previous warmup this winter back in March has made this current round of spring weather much more civil. There has been very little activity over the last couple days as many slopes have made a nice transition to a more stable snowpack. Backcountry skier and riders need to keep their head in the game as we string together several nights of mild low temperatures in the mountains. You don’t want to get surprised by a small loose wet avalanche that gouges deeper into the snowpack and becomes large enough to bury you. The highest elevation terrain and northerly facing aspects may still have cold powder like snow or are still going through the spring transitional process. As dry snow becomes moist for the first time, loose wet avalanches can be more easily triggered. Gusty alpine winds today may help keep some of those snow surfaces cool.

CBAC has transitioned into conditions updates issued every other day, before posting our spring travel advice on Saturday. In short, standard practice for forecast centers on an every other day schedule is to not issue danger ratings. You can see this with the “no rating” for our avalanche danger ratings. We have chosen to follow these standards of practice and not issue danger ratings this week while on this schedule.

Reported By: Evan Ross

Five Day Trend

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Today

Tomorrow

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  • No Rating
  • 1
    Low
  • 2
    Moderate
  • 3
    Considerable
  • 4
    High
  • 5
    Extreme